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Descendants of Francis HOULDSWORTH

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27. Anna STRINGFELLOW

Derbyshire Births And Baptisms
Anna Stringfellow
Baptism date 21 Jun 1736
Denomination Anglican St John the Baptist Ault Hucknall
Father Jacobi Stringfellow
Mother Martha
Residence Astwith Derbyshire England
Record set Derbyshire Births And Baptisms
Category Birth, Marriage, Death & Parish Records
Subcategory Parish Baptisms

English marriages
Hannah Stringfellow
GENDER: Female
MARRIAGE DATE: 09 Nov 1753
MARRIAGE PLACE: Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England
SPOUSE: John Cooper
FHL FILM NUMBER: 1752143

England, Select Deaths and Burials, 1538-1991
Hannah Cooper
Gender Female
Marital Status Married
Burial Date 28 Aug 1781
Burial Place Chesterfield, Derbyshire, England
Spouse John Cooper
FHL Film Number 1752142

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29. William HOULDSWORTH

Baptism: William Houldsworth
Baptism Date: 20 May 1770
Baptism Place: Gonalston, Nottinghamshire, England
Father's Name: Henry Houldsworth
Mother's Name: Ann

William inherited a fortune from an uncle in Jamaica.

England Marriages: William Houldsworth
Marriage Date 11 Feb 1793
Marriage Place Gonalston, Nottingham, England
Spouse Sarah Hall
FHL Film Number 0503496 IT 1

William was of Farnsfield, Nottinghamshire and of Coltness, Lanarkshire, Scotland.  According to Burke's Peerage William and Sarah had no children.

THE STEUARTS OF COLTNESS AND ALLANTON p51
..Sir Henry B. Steuart, of Collairnie, Fifeshire, succeeded as fifth Baronet of Coltness, the property itself passing, by purchase, in 1842 to Thomas Houldsworth. Thomas was then M.P. for Nottingham.  Mr Thomas Houldsworth died in 1852, when Coltness went first to his eldest brother, William, then to Henry, father of another Henry, at whose death, in 1868, the property passed to its present owner, James Houldsworth, Esq., born 1825. (see W. Promphrey's "Old Lairds of Coltness" Wishaw, 1879)

Oral family history reports that James Scott (b1838 Bothwell) was the illegitimate son of a William Houldsworth and Janet Scott (an upstairs-downstairs affair) and that James Scott got money but not the name of his father.  There is some basis for this view as James Scott had a long term role at the Coltness iron works and the Coltness Ironworks were opened in 1839 by the Houldsworth family at Newmains.  When James Scott died he had a substantial portion of shares in the Coltness Ironworks.  There are at least two DNA matches to Jane Margaret SCOTT that have HOULDSWORTH's as a common ancestor which tend to confirm this verbal family history.

This William Houldsworth of Farnsfield, Nottingham, who was born in 1770 is a possibility to be James Scott's father.  He was passed the Coltness estate in 1852 on the death of his brother Thomas.  This William (b1770) did not have any legitimate children of his own but it was not as clear if he was involved in the Glasgow iron business until well after James was born.  So it is not possible to completely align the oral family history with the facts.  What is clear is that James was associated with the Houldsworths and that he was wealthy even though his mother died young.  A DNA match between an Andrew Wilde and Jane Margaret Scott has been found that would seem to indicate that the Houldsworth as a father of James would more likely be of an older generation such as the above William Houldsworth b1770 or Thomas Houldsworth b1771. In that case Andrew Wilde and Jane Scott would have been 6th cousins 3 times removed.  Their common ancestors would be Francis HOULDSWORTH and Hannah. Andrew and Jane's DNA match is only 7cM across 1 segment.

It is noted that James Scott's last son was called William Henry Scott.  It is possible that he named this child after his father William Houldsworth.

Probate Index: William Houldsworth
Probate Date 22 Sep 1854
Residence Farnsfield, Nottinghamshire, England

The Beginnings of the Houldsworths of Coltness. By William Houldsworth Macleod, Latterly Assisted by Sir Henry H. Houldsworth.

Farnsfield in 1853 is a populous village and parish, pleasantly situated 4 miles west-north-west of Southwell. Its parish is within the liberty of Southwell and Scrooby, and contains 1,195 inhabitants and 3,625a 2r 13p of land, rated to the county rate at pounds3,524. It was enclosed in 1777, when 350 acres were allotted to the three Prebendaries of Normanton, Norwell Overhall and Pallishall, 157a 3r 15p to the vicar, and 5a 1r 21p to the Chapter of Southwell, in lieu of tithes. The Archbishop of York is lord of the manor, in which William Holdsworth Esq., Emanuel Howitt Esq., Richard Hall Esq., Jonathan bell, Richard Truswell and some others have estates, and also neat houses in the village.

The church has one aisle and a square tower, in which are five harmonious bells. There is a small organ, placed by Miss Milward in 1851. The living is a discharged vicarage valued at 169 pounds, and has 19a 3r 6p of glebe, besides the allotment made at the enclosure. The Chapter of Southwell are the patrons, and the Rev. Henry Robert Wilkins B.A. is the incumbent. The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists each have a chapel in the village.

The school, with a house and two acres of land, was purchased in 1799 with 400 pounds arising from the benefactions of Messrs Watson and Hornby, and the sale of the Bull land. The master teaches 11 free scholars. The poor have the interest of 73 pounds 15s from the poor rates, left by several donors, and 45 pounds bequeathed in 1820 by Samuel Higgs, and now in the Southwell Savings' Bank. They have also 6 pounds yearly from Temple Croft Close, left by an unknown donor, and the interest of 20 pounds, left in 1827 by Mary Awdes. The interest of 20 pounds was left by Joseph Mellows a few years ago.

William Houldsworth of Farnsfield in Nottingham - Will Summary of dated 1854
Executors my three nephews Henry Houldsworth of Manchester in the County of Lancaster Esquire, William Houldsworth and John Houldsworth of Glasgow Esquires and Philip Richard Falkner of Newark upon Trent in the County of Nottingham Gentleman.

My sister Elizabeth Duffy the legacy of one hundred pounds and to her daughter Anne Hall the legacy of one thousand pounds  

My sister Ann Hussey the legacy of nineteen guineas, and to her daughter Ann Davidson the legacy of two hundred pounds, and her other daughters of Ann Hussey the legacy of one hundred pounds unto each

To the nine children of my late sister Margaret McConnel the sum of twenty thousand pounds in the following shares:
nephew Henry McConnel one thousand pounds
nephew James McConnel one thousand pounds
nephew John McConnel five thousand pounds
nephew William McConnel two thousand pounds
nephew Thomas Houldsworth McConnel three thousand pounds
nephew David McConnel three thousand pounds
nephew Frederick McConnel three thousand pounds
nice Sarah Jane Wood one thousand pounds
nice Mary Ann Routh one thousand pounds.

Niece Mary Wright the legacy of nineteen guineas and to her sister Isabella Duffield the legacy of one thousand pounds
nephew John Duffield the legacy of fifty pounds
nephew William Houldsworth the legacy of five thousand pounds
nephew John Houldsworth the legacy of five thousand pounds
niece Ann Murray the legacy of one thousand pounds
niece Jane Grierson the legacy of two thousand
niece Mary Hunter the legacy of one thousand pounds

Philip Richard Falkner the husband of my late niece Margaret Falkner the legacy of ten thousand pounds
To each of the four children of my niece Margaret Falkner the legacy of three thousand pounds to be divided between them in equal shares and to Olivia Falkner the wife of the said Philip Richard Falkner the legacy of two hundred pounds

Ann Hopkinson who resides in my family the legacy of six hundred pounds

To each of the ten children of my niece Sarah Kirke the legacy of one hundred pounds
niece Mary Morris the legacy of two hundred pounds

Robert Hopkinson who now lives with me the legacy of six hundred pounds

Cousin Hooton Deverall three hundred pounds
Lever Howit of Farnsfield Gentleman two hundred pounds
William Swann the younger late of Farnsfield and now of Denuncilington two hundred pounds
Mary Anne Tongue and Sarah Tongue the children of James Tongue of Farnsfield and Mary his wife the legacy of one hundred pounds each.  

My Domestic Servants living at death and who shall then have been a year in my service except the said Ann Hopkinson and Robert Hopkinson a years wages over and above the wages due to them

Amelia White late of Farnsfield nineteen guineas and to her sister Mrs Pale nineteen guineas
Mrs White of Porto Bella Edinburgh nineteen guineas and to Mrs Queeury of Holyrood House Edinburgh nineteen guineas
Elizabeth Hopkinson and Jill Hopkinson the sisters of the said Robert Hopkinson nineteen guineas each
Elizabeth Milward, Susannah Millward and Mary Millward all of Epperstone Spinsters nineteen guineas each
Frances Watson of Southwell Spinster and sister Mary Watson nineteen guineas each
Frances Jarob of Southwell nineteen guineas
Miss Foster of Southwell and her sister Emma Foster nineteen guineas each
Miss Woolley of Hibbirton Road London nineteen guineas
Miss Markay of Coleraine Ireland nineteen guineas
Captain Hewes of Epperstone nineteen guineas
Mrs William Duffy of Newark upon Trent widow of Captain Duffy nineteen guineas

Thomas Tongue the son of James Tongue the legacy of one thousand pounds on reaching 21

My linen house hold goods and furniture to the said Philip Richard Falkner absolutely
My money and securities for money, farming store and all other my goods chattels and personal residue of all my money personal estate and objects to my nephew Henry Houldsworth absolutely
To my sister Elizabeth Duffy an annuity of one hundred pounds during her life
To her daughter Ann Hall an annuity of fifty pounds
To John Duffield the annuity of fifty pounds

To Isabella Duffield the annuity of fifty pounds
To Ann Hopkinson the annuity of fifty pounds
To Sarah Kirke the annuity of one hundred pounds
To Mary Tongue the wife of James Tongue the weekly sum of eight shillings
To Thomas Tongue son of the said James Tongue the weekly sum of ten shillings

Residual estate to:
Thomas Houldsworth the second son of my nephew Henry Houldsworth
James Houldsworth first son of Henry Houldsworth
William Henry Houldsworth the third son of Henry Houldsworth
Walter James Houldsworth the fourth son of Henry Houldsworth
Arthur Hooton Houldsworth the fifth son of Henry Houldsworth
Henry Houldsworth, William Houldsworth, John Houldsworth, Philip Richard Falkner and Lever Howit

Apply the rents for the benefit of Susannah Tongue daughter of the said James Tongue
I give cottages yards gardens closes and premises to all the children of Susanna Tongue
The same unto her brother Thomas Tongue
One hundred pounds a piece to Mary Ann Tongue and Sarah Tongue
whilst Susanna Tongue or Thomas Tongue or her child or children
A legacy of nineteen guineas apiece to Miss Frances Watson, Miss Mary Watson and Miss Makey

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Sarah HALL

England & Wales Baptism Records, 1530-1906
Sarah Hall
Gender Female
Baptism Date 31/07/1768
Baptism Place Hoveringham Nottinghamshire England
Father John Hall
Mother Sarah Hall

England & Wales Marriages, 1538-1940
William Houldsworth
Gender Male
Marriage Date 11/02/1793
Marriage Place Gonalston, Nottinghamshire, England
Spouse Sarah Hall

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31. Henry HOULDSWORTH

Baptism: Henry Houldsworth
Baptism Date: 4 Jul 1774
Baptism Place: Gonalston, Nottinghamshire, England
Father's Name: Henry Houldsworth
Mother's Name: Ann


Henry Houldsworth was born in Nottingham in 1774 the son of Henry Houldsworth, a yeoman farmer,  and Ann Hooton.  

For a short time has was a grocer's assistant in a small shop in a back street of Nottingham.  His brother William paid the grocer 50 pounds to release Henry from his indentures.
He then left Nottingham, aged 18, for the Manchester Cotton Mills in 1792. He was attracted by reports of riches in towns transformed by the industrial revolution.  He first entered into a partnership with Christopher Stone at a mule under Jonathan Pollard, one of the pioneers of the cotton industry.  Here Henry acquired the art of cotton spinning.  He requested Thomas his brother to join him but after a short time Thomas returned to his stocking-weaving in Nottingham with doubts about the future of cotton. Henery them bought our Christopher Stone's share in the mule.

Few Southrons could at any time boast that they had invaded Scotland with success, but Henry Houldsworth not only did so, but founded a family that for nearly ninety years increased and prospered. Towards the end of 18th century cotton spinning had begun to take its place among Scotland's industries.

Henry first visited Scotland as a teenager, travelling to Glasgow with 40 kilos of spun yarn to sell. This first visit was to have far-reaching consequences, and led to his life taking a new direction. He continued to visit Glasgow from time to time, establishing connections within the cotton industry, and in 1799 he moved to Glasgow to teach spinning in the Woodside Cotton Mill, located on the River Kelvin in the west end of Glasgow.  Henry, was brought to Glasgow by William Gillespie, of Woodside and Anderston, to manage a small cotton mill which then stood on the Kelvin, a little below the present Great Western Road Bridge. Houldsworth must soon have got this mill into his own hands, for in the Directory of 1801 William Gillespie & Co. are described simply as calico printers in Anderston, and Henry Houldsworth & Co. appear as cotton spinners at Woodside.

By his marriage with Jane, daughter of John Richardson, of Glasgow, Henry Houldsworth had three sons:
(i) Henry, born 1797, died 1867, second of Coltness, a partner in the great cotton spinning business in Manchester founded by his uncle, Thomas Houldsworth;
(ii) William, born 1798, died 1853;
(iii) John Houldsworth, of Cranstonhill, born at Cranstonhill, 1807, died at Glasgow, in 1859.

Henry then began to expand the cotton business, and by 1831 was the second largest cotton spinner in Glasgow. This business he afterwards removed to Cheapside Street, Anderston, where he carried it on in partnership with his two sons, William and John, under the firm of Henry Houldsworth & Sons.

Houldsworth was fascinated by new technology. He was also involved with the early paddle-steamers and had devised the Houldsworth Differential Gear to maintain a constant tension on thread (an invention which has come down to us in the gears of motor vehicles). To repair his mill machinery Henry Houldsworth took over an iron foundry in the burgh of Anderston, now a part of Glasgow. Cotton spinning was then the great Glasgow industry, but with the insight of true business genius the Houldsworths saw that iron was to be the mainstay of Glasgow, and accordingly the Anderston Foundry and Machine Works was started also in Cheapside Street.  This fired his interest in the iron industry. In 1836 he bought the Coltness Estate near Wishaw in Lanarkshire and set up the Coltness Iron Works in 1839. He was 65 years old at the time.

Gradually Glasgow fell out of the cotton machinery trade.

The success of Coltness led to Henry Houldsworth founding the Dalmellington Iron Company at Dunaskin in 1848. He was 74 years of age when he began this project. His life illustrates the tremendous energy and technological change of the 19th century which transformed the once pastoral south west of Scotland into a booming industrial heart of an Empire.

Henry Houldsworth died on 10th October 1853 at Coltness House in his 80th year, and is buried in the ruins of Cambusnethan Old Church, near Wishaw.

Henry Houldsworth's will was proved 12/11/1853 of Coltness and Cranstonhill, residing at Coltness House, co Lanark, father of Anne Houldsworth, etc

THE STEUARTS OF COLTNESS AND ALLANTON p51
..Sir Henry B. Steuart, of Collairnie, Fifeshire, succeeded as fifth Baronet of Coltness, the property itself passing, by purchase, in 1842 to Thomas Houldsworth then M.P. for Nottingham.  Mr Houldsworth died in 1852, when Coltness went first to his eldest brother, William, then to Henry, father of another Henry, at whose death, in 1868, the property passed to its present owner, James Houldsworth, Esq., born 1825. (see W. Promphrey's "Old Lairds of Coltness" Wishaw, 1879)


The Dalmellington Iron Company remained in the control of the Houldsworth family, firstly via Henry's children and later his grandchildren until 1906. Houldsworth's achievements serve as an illustration of the type of person who we can regard as a driving force behind the Industrial Revolution.

Early in the 19th century Henry Houldsworth bought Cranston Hill, then a pretty villa a little to the west of the village of Anderston. Now the site of the villa, pleasure ground, and garden is covered with works and houses, and every year is bringing nearer the fulfillment of the prophecy that Glasgow Cross would stand on Cranston Hill. When Anderston was a burgh Henry Houldsworth was its perpetual Provost, and its last Provost was John, his son.

HOULDSWORTH STREET (GLASGOW)
This street is named after Henry Houldsworth. His success was phenomenal, as by the beginning of last century he was running on his own account a large factory in Cheapside Street and also a machine shop in John Street (City), where he was the first to make cotton-spinning machinery in Scotland. On the decay of the cotton trade he merged into that of iron, by starting the Anderston Foundry; and the family are now represented by the Houldsworths of Coltness, which estate they purchased in 1836.

A portrait of Henry Houldsworth (1770-1853) by Sir John Watson Gordon (1788-1864) is of note.

Henry Houldsworth Will Summary 1852-53
Henry Houldsworth of Coltness and Crunstonhill residing in Coltness House
Dispose to Henry Houldsworth cotton spinner in Manchester, William Houldsworth and John Houldsworth cotton spinners in Glasgow my sons
Philip Richard Falkner, Solicitor in Newark and James Hunter, Manager of the Coltness Iron Works my sons in law
Son Henry Houldsworth can decide to purchase the estate of Coltness and Cranstonhill
Mrs Jane Houldsworth or Grierson widow of the Reverend Dr John Grierson minister at Dumblane my daughter and to her children 12,000 pounds
Mrs Anne Houldsworth or Murray wife of James Murray cotton spinner Manchester my daughter and heirs 10,000 pounds
Jane Falkner eldest daughter of Philip Richard Falkner and her heirs 1,500 pounds
Margaret Falkner second daughter of Philip Richard Falkner and her heirs 5,500 pounds
Helen Falkner third daughter of Philip Richard Falkner and her heirs 5,500 pounds
Philip Henry Falkner son of Philip Richard Falkner and his heirs 2,500 pounds
Grandsons Henry Hamilton Houldsworth merchant in Manchester, Philip Henry Falkner and William Houldsworth son of William Houldsworth trustees
Mary Houldsworth or Hunter 8,000 pounds
Son William Houldsworth 20,000 pounds
Son John Houldsworth  20,000 pounds
Son Henry Houldsworth 20,000 pounds
Andrew Gray my house servant 19 pounds
John Cummings my ploughman 10 pounds
Domestic servants one year's wages except for Jessie Walker and Margaret Rime who are separately provided for
Alexander Young my coachman 5 pounds

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44. Jane HOULDSWORTH

Scotland GRO: 14/02/1801 HOULDSWORTH JANE HENRY HOULDSWORTH/JANET RICHARDSON FR1003 CHILD 4  BARONY GLASGOW CITY CITY/LANARK 622/00 0040 0196

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James HUNTER

James Hunter was manager of the Coltness Iron Works in 1853

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32. Mary HOULDSWORTH

Birth: Mary Houldsworth
Gender: Female
Baptism Date: 19 Jul 1776
Baptism Place: Gonalston, Nottinghamshire, England
Father's Name: Henry Houldsworth
Mother's Name: Ann

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33. Margaret HOULDSWORTH

Birth: Margreat Houldsworth
Birth Date: 11 Jul 1778
Baptism Date: 20 Jul 1778
Baptism Place: Gonalston, Nottinghamshire, England
Age at Baptism: 0
Father's Name: Henry Houldsworth
Mother's Name: Ann


James McConnel, was born on 25.6.1752 and married on 28.5.1799 at Gonalston Church, Nottinghamshire, Margaret Houldsworth, the daughter of Henry Houldsworth of Chesterfield, Co. York, and Ann Hooton of the same county.

England marriages: Margaret Houldsworth
Marriage Date 28 May 1799
Marriage Place Gonalston, Nottinghamshire, England
Spouse James McConnel

On May 28, 1799, being then nearly thirty-seven years old, James McConnel married, at Gonalston Church, Nottinghamshire, Margaret Houldsworth, at that time in her twenty-first year. She was the second daughter of Henry Houldsworth, and was born, 11th July 1778, at his farm of Gonalston Hagg. Her mother's maiden name was Ann Hooton. Her father's mother's name was, I think, Deverill. There were four brothers and four sisters, who all lived to be adults, and nearly all to old age. Margaret Houldsworth was a great favourite in the family ; she was so at least in after life. When growing into womanhood, she made a friend of Mary Chowath, of Annesley, near Newstead Abbey, a Nottinghamshire heiress, well known by the romantic attachment she inspired in the youthful Lord Byron. This young lady more than once invited Margaret to her house. It was not, however, in Nottinghamshire, but at the house in Manchester, of her brother, Thomas Houldsworth, that James McConnel became acquainted with her. Thomas, like James McConnel, was settled in Manchester, as a fine spinner, and became a most prosperous one.  Margaret resided with her brother Thomas from January 19 (perhaps sooner) till about May 7, 1799, when she went home to be married.

England non conformist Registers
Death: Margaret McConnel
Birth Date abt 1779
Spouse James
Death Date 4 Mar 1845
Death Place Manchester, Lancashire, England
Denomination Presbyterian or Unitarian
Piece 0131: Manchester, Upper Brook St, Chorlton upon Medlock  Presbyterian or Unitarian), 1840-1855

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54. John MCCONNEL

Manchester Births: John Mac Connel
Birth Date 03 Oct 1806
Baptism Date 12 Nov 1806
Baptism Place Mosley Street Presbyterian OR Unitarian,Manchester,Lancashire,England
Father James Mac Connel
Mother Margaret
FHL Film Number 0560887 (RG4 131), 0560887 (RG4 2856)

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58. David Cannon MCCONNEL

England Births: David Cannon Mc Connel
Birth Date 14 Jan 1818
Baptism Date 26 Mar 1818
Baptism Place Mosley Street Presbyterian OR Unitarian,Manchester,Lancashire,England
Father James Mc Connel
Mother Margaret
FHL Film Number 0560887 (RG4 131), 0560887 (RG4 2856)

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59. Mary Anne MCCONNEL

Mary Anne McConnel, the daughter of James McConnel of The Polygon, Ardwick, Manchester, and wife of Dr. Charles Henry Felix Routh, was born on 7th March, 1819 (i.e., in the reign of George III) and was married on the 26.8.1852 at Ardwick. Her father, James McConnel, was born on 25.6.1752 and married on 28.5.1799 at Gonalston Church, Nottinghamshire, Margaret Houldsworth, the daughter of Henry Houldsworth of Chesterfield, Co. York, and Ann Hooton of the same county. Mary Ann died in London in 1910, aged 91, and is buried in Kensal Green beside her husband.

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34. Ann HOULDSWORTH

Birth: Ann Houldsworth
Birth Date: 10 Aug 1780
Baptism Date: 2 Sep 1780
Baptism Place: Gonalston, Nottinghamshire, England
Age at Baptism: 0
Father's Name: Henry Houldsworth
Mother's Name: Ann

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William HUSSEY

Ann Houldsworth was the wife of William Hussey of Newhall, Greenhead, a well known cotton spinner of his day. Their grandson, Robert Davidson, was a writer.

William Hussey and Son, cotton spinners, had a cotton mill or factory situated in Dale street, Bridgeton, in or near Glasgow.

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36. Elizabeth HOULDSWORTH

Baptism: Elizabeth Houldsworth
Baptism Date: 28 Apr 1784
Baptism Place: Gonalston, Nottinghamshire, England
Father's Name: Henry Houldsworth
Mother's Name: Ann

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63. Ann GLOSSUP

England Baptisms: Ann Glossop
Baptism Date 11 Jul 1820
Baptism Place Epperstone,Nottingham,England
Father Sampson Glossop
Mother Elizabeth
FHL Film Number 503492, 504062, 504069, 504093

Possible Marriage: Ann Glossop
Registration Quarter: Oct-Nov-Dec
Registration Year: 1842
Registration District: Mansfield
County: Nottinghamshire
Event Place: Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, England
Volume: 15
Page: 964
Line Number: 82

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